Kenyan President uses Tory human rights plans to defend war crimes charges

This follows thematically from my first blog entry regarding the UK’s threat to withdraw from the ECHR and the Council of Europe. ‘Putting Britain First’ policies that ignore that Britain is part of the international community in order to quell short-sighted, nationalistic and isolationist political minorities threatens to undermine the reputation of the UK as a global role-model for the adherence to the rule of law (including international law to which all countries are bound) and as supposed champions of human rights at home and abroad.

Original Article by @AdamWagner1 of 1 Crown Office Row chambers and ukhumanrightsblog.com – Definitely endorsing you to follow both.

UK Human Rights Blog

Photo credit: Guardian.co.uk Photo credit: Guardian.co.uk

It is easy to forget that our domestic debate over the European Convention on Human Rights might be having an international impact. But the UK is only one of 47 states which is party to the Convention, and the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg protects over 800 million people.

This morning, we brought you exclusive interviews with survivors of the Beslan massacre who are rightly worried that if the UK leaves the Convention, or even threatens to leave as the Conservatives did recently, that will affect their fight for justice. In short, Vladimir Putin would have a ready excuse for ignoring any conclusions reached by the Court.

Well, here is another example of the effect which political trash-talking about the ECHR can have. Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta is facing war crimes charges in the Hague relating to ethnic violence which erupted after the 2007 elections leaving…

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George Revel, LL.B LL.M (PIL)

Engaging with contemporary international legal affairs that are challenging and complex in general, I am focused on researching statehood and international legal personality as well as international criminal law. I regularly consult with multiple NGOs and corporate interests, aiding in the development of policy and engagement strategies with a regard for international law and regulations. As a corollary to these advisory positions, I also engage in university teaching of international law (international criminal law, comparative constitutional law, public international law) at UK universities as an external lecturer. I frequently participate in related conferences and events throughout the UK and elsewhere, developing strong academic and professional networks. This has often resulted in my ability to connect individuals and groups who may be of particular interest to each other, as well as fostering a positive collaborative environment amongst my colleagues.

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